Decoupling the cost of changes from project size

When I explain my idea of software design to people I draw a simple two-dimensional graph. The x-axis is the project size. The y-axis is the required effort to make a change to the project. There are two functions shown in the graph. One is slowly growing linearly and represents the cost of changes in a well-designed project. The other one is growing quadratically and represents the cost of changes in a badly designed project. The linear function starts above the quadratic function. A well-designed project requires more effort up front. Over time, a badly designed project requires more and more effort until the cost of changes passes and exceeds the cost of changes in a well designed project.

In the best case, the cost of change is independent of project size. This ideal can not be reached. A change in a 100 million LOC project is always going to cost more than a similar change in a 100 LOC project. However, we should strive for this ideal. In fact, decoupling the cost of changes from project size might be the ultimate reason for thoughtful project design. Maybe all of its other benefits are just steps on the way.

There is a big-O analogy in here. Let’s define big-P as the function that provides the worst-case cost for making a change to a project. In projects of P(1) the cost of changes is independent of project size. This is the theoretical ideal. Projects are in amazing shape if they are in P(log n) where a change of size n requires only twice the effort in a 10x larger code base. P(n) is still OK and probably better than most existing large projects. Beyond these complexity classes, projects quickly reach infinite costs for changes: desired changes become impossible.

Decoupling the cost of changes from project size

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